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Hacked account! Help me.
02-06-2015, 01:25 AM (This post was last modified: 02-06-2015 04:38 AM by Vexis.)
Post: #11
RE: Hacked account! Help me.
(02-06-2015 12:12 AM)JohnDonkin Wrote:  Personal Information: By default your email will remain hidden. If you choose to disclose this or any other personal information, you do so at your own risk. Sharing login details for the game or forum is strictly prohibited.

Sharing login details for the game or forum is STRICTLY PROHIBITED!!!

Prohibit:
1. to forbid (an action, activity, etc.) by authority or law:
2. to forbid the action of (a person).
3. to prevent; hinder.
4. not permitted; "impermissible behavior"

The fact that you even KNOW this information Sona and are exclaiming it publicly is wrong.

IF SOMEONE OFFERS YOU THEIR PASSWORD.....DON'T ACCEPT IT!

(02-06-2015 12:12 AM)Tally Wrote:  The account was not 'hacked'. When a player shares their password with other players, who then use that account, this is not hacking.

I'm so sick of people saying their account was hacked.....

Hacked:
1. Informal To alter (a computer program)
2. To gain access to (a computer file or network) illegally or without authorization.

Given:
1. to present voluntarily and without expecting compensation
2. to hand to someone
3. to place in someone's care
4. to grant (permission, opportunity, etc.) to someone

What you really mean to say is, "HELP MY ACCOUNT HAS BEEN GIVEN AWAY!"

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02-06-2015, 01:59 AM
Post: #12
RE: Hacked account! Help me.
Precisely. Giving somebody the details to your account is ultimately granting them permission to use it.

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02-06-2015, 10:35 AM
Post: #13
RE: Hacked account! Help me.
There's a few basic rules in how to handle passwords, that... pretty much anyone should know:

0) Pick a strong password. A strong password is one that is very unlikely to be guessed by a resourceful attacker. Common rules for this are to make it long enough (6 characters isn't), try to not use only one small class of characters (e.g., don't do all digits or all letters), and make it unrelated to any publicly available information of you, including your username, real name, etc.
1) If your password is compromised, change it. If you suspect for any reason that your password might have been found out, even if you are not sure of this, change it. There is nothing to lose by doing so, and you nullify the attack.
2) Do not derive new passwords from old ones. When required to change a password, many people take the "easy way out": they change a letter from lowercase to uppercase, just add a 1 at the end (or increment the number if there already is one), or do some other trivial change that makes the new password be easily guessable from the old one in less than 100 tries. While this is okay when you are just changing your password without need (perhaps because you set the wrong one to begin with, perhaps because a system requirement demands you to do so), when you change it because someone might have found out the old one, this is a very bad idea.
3) Do not share your password. This is a no-brainer. Keep your password to yourself, and ensure that nobody can get access to it. Inadvertent sharing occurs a lot, as well — that is what happens when you write down your password somewhere and someone else finds it, when you leave your account logged in and someone gets on it, and so on. Make sure that the only one who can ever know your password is yourself.
4) If you do share your password, understand the risks. There are plenty of situations in which you might need, or want, to share your password. Many of them are legitimate, and the previous rule of "do not share" is not absolute — some cases do legitimately require you to share your password. However, if you do so, keep in mind that you are giving the recipient full and unrestricted access to your account. Anything you can do, they now can, as well — that includes completely impairing your account, or even sharing it further, or locking you out of it. Understand that this may happen if you share your password, and, if you share it with the wrong person, it will. Also understand that when you do this, the results of doing so are your fault and responsibility.
5) Do not reuse passwords. Use different passwords in different places. While this does not necessarily mean "different passwords in every account" (many people have dozens of accounts, and cannot remember dozens of passwords — and writing them down is a bad idea), keep unrelated accounts separated, with unrelated passwords. If your password is compromised (and you should always assume it can be), the more places in which that password is used, the more places in which your accounts will be exposed. Using different passwords in different places protects your other accounts.


I'm pretty sure most people know this, but I guess a reminder is a good idea sometimes.

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02-06-2015, 10:43 AM
Post: #14
RE: Hacked account! Help me.
(02-06-2015 10:35 AM)Inuyasha Wrote:  There's a few basic rules in how to handle passwords, that... pretty much anyone should know:

0) Pick a strong password. A strong password is one that is very unlikely to be guessed by a resourceful attacker. Common rules for this are to make it long enough (6 characters isn't), try to not use only one small class of characters (e.g., don't do all digits or all letters), and make it unrelated to any publicly available information of you, including your username, real name, etc.
1) If your password is compromised, change it. If you suspect for any reason that your password might have been found out, even if you are not sure of this, change it. There is nothing to lose by doing so, and you nullify the attack.
2) Do not derive new passwords from old ones. When required to change a password, many people take the "easy way out": they change a letter from lowercase to uppercase, just add a 1 at the end (or increment the number if there already is one), or do some other trivial change that makes the new password be easily guessable from the old one in less than 100 tries. While this is okay when you are just changing your password without need (perhaps because you set the wrong one to begin with, perhaps because a system requirement demands you to do so), when you change it because someone might have found out the old one, this is a very bad idea.
3) Do not share your password. This is a no-brainer. Keep your password to yourself, and ensure that nobody can get access to it. Inadvertent sharing occurs a lot, as well — that is what happens when you write down your password somewhere and someone else finds it, when you leave your account logged in and someone gets on it, and so on. Make sure that the only one who can ever know your password is yourself.
4) If you do share your password, understand the risks. There are plenty of situations in which you might need, or want, to share your password. Many of them are legitimate, and the previous rule of "do not share" is not absolute — some cases do legitimately require you to share your password. However, if you do so, keep in mind that you are giving the recipient full and unrestricted access to your account. Anything you can do, they now can, as well — that includes completely impairing your account, or even sharing it further, or locking you out of it. Understand that this may happen if you share your password, and, if you share it with the wrong person, it will. Also understand that when you do this, the results of doing so are your fault and responsibility.
5) Do not reuse passwords. Use different passwords in different places. While this does not necessarily mean "different passwords in every account" (many people have dozens of accounts, and cannot remember dozens of passwords — and writing them down is a bad idea), keep unrelated accounts separated, with unrelated passwords. If your password is compromised (and you should always assume it can be), the more places in which that password is used, the more places in which your accounts will be exposed. Using different passwords in different places protects your other accounts.


I'm pretty sure most people know this, but I guess a reminder is a good idea sometimes.

I think this also. You can not give out you password to anyone. It might be a 50% chance of getting banned. Hacking? A person trying to get in another account.
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02-06-2015, 01:16 PM
Post: #15
RE: Hacked account! Help me.
Many things said here aren't exactly, true. Passwords sharing with a friend is fine and not against the rules.

Here is part of a PM that Rob sent me about a year ago.

Rob Donkin Wrote:Thanks for this. We will keep an eye on things but we don't intend to act on this just yet. Generally speaking sharing an account with a friend is fine, it's when passwords get posted online that it can get out of hand and the account needs to be banned.

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02-06-2015, 02:06 PM
Post: #16
RE: Hacked account! Help me.
All you can do is reset your password. If you don't have acces to the e-mail used to create the account, then there's nothing the BEO staff can do.
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02-06-2015, 03:35 PM
Post: #17
RE: Hacked account! Help me.
LOL, Skycore is then going mad! Smiley_Sad

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